Reviews

The MGM Review features critical writing and commentary on academic texts related to the field of media geography, as well as reviews of works in other media that address, or can be effectively used to address, key themes in the subfield.  These themes may include representations of place, space, and landscape, the spatial forms and relations of different media, and the roles that media play in affective and emotional geographies. Works for possible review may include film, television, and animation, creative fiction and non-fiction, and exhibitions and conferences. 

 

Ecologies of the Moving Image: Cinema, Affect, Nature, by Adrian J. Ivakhiv, Waterloo, ON: WLU Press, 2013, 435 pp, ISBN978-1-55458-905-0 Review by Colin Gardner

In his meditations on thought and cinema in Cinema 2: The Time Image, Gilles Deleuze noted that the cinematographic image showed us an essential link between man and the world that developed either in the direction of a transformation of the world ... Read More...

Dr. Who and Race, edited by Lindy Orthia, Wilmington, NC: Intellect, 2013, 318 pp, ISBN9781783200368 Review by Hannah Carilyn Gunderman

Academic publications regarding Doctor Who have increased in recent decades, exciting not only fans of the show but also scholars who study social justice through interconnections of science-fiction and reality. Doctor Who and Race is an edited volume of 22 chapters exploring perceptions, observations, and often problematic representations of race... Read More...

An Age of License: A Travelogue, by Lucy Knisley, Seattle, WA: Fantagraphics Books, 2014, 208 pp, ISBN978-1-60699-768-0 Review by Shaun Huston

Cartoonist and writer Lucy Knisley's body of work has emphasized memoir, autobiography and self-reflection, particularly around the subjects of food and travel, which she uses to discuss matters of family, personal relationships, and philosophies of life. Her latest long form comic, An Age of License, continues in these modes, but with the emphasis on travel.

Age of License... Read More...

Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture, by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green, New York: New York University Press, 2013, 351 pp., ISBN978-0-8147-4350-8 Review by Laura L. Sharp

Relationships are complicated things, evidenced nowhere better than in the finicky bond between media producers and their audiences at a time when the tidy borders defining these once seemingly distinct entities are being eroded. As social relations are increasingly imbricated with social networking it is often around media content that these relations are built and maintained. For those in... Read More...